"Everybody Knows"

In Everybody knows, Laura, a Spanish woman living in Buenos Aires, returns to her hometown with her two children to attend her sister's wedding. However, the trip is upset by unexpected events that bring secrets into the open.

Directed by Iranian Asghar Farhadi, winner of two Oscars, and starring the overvalued Spanish couple Javier Bardem and Penélope Cruz, the film on a somewhat near subject and with a cast that seems to be stellar seems to be at first seen the best of the year. But, of course, appearances are usually very different.

It begins with Agatha Christie and ends up being an exaggerated Spanish soap opera, before playing a little bit with social realism and the question of who owns the land that immigrants work. Sadly, Farhadi never decides for any of those topics and makes the film extremely slow and even more confusing. I would say that the biggest problem is two: 1) the decision to reveal two vital facts for the story too soon and 2) the choice of two of the protagonists - Javier Bardem and Penélepe Creu.

Javier Bardem, Eduard Fernández, Ricardo Darín and Penélope Cruz

Javier Bardem, Eduard Fernández, Ricardo Darín and Penélope Cruz

The two main actors interpret their ostensibly complex roles that, however, only allow a limited expression on the screen. Laura’s Cruz, for example, cries and weeps. A lot. Too much. In all scenes, weeping and exaggerated screams are heard. And please, someone should tell to Penélope to not try to put accents, that she doesn't know how to do it, she not credible... I said it when Loving Pablo and I repeat it now. Bardem is not better at all, always trying to hold scenes based on hysteria, courtesy of Farhadi (who also wrote the script).

Javier Bardem and Asghar Farhadi

Javier Bardem and Asghar Farhadi

That said, in the cast there are some actors that make the film more "entertaining" (Ricardo Darín, Inma Cuesta and Barbara Lennie). This cast, however, is so big that it is difficult to know who everybody is. The identity and motivation of the kidnappers, when they are revealed, are not explored, leaving the movie without a source of interesting tension.

The film is disappointing for its plot more than unlikely to happen. Farhadi may have won an Oscar for A Separation and one for The Salesman, but it is very unlikely that he will repeat the feat with this one, his first drama (if it is) in Spanish.

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disappointing